Travelog for

Seahorse Seahorse
The big-bellied seahorse is one of two in Sydney, very territorial, one can see the same specimens in the same spot for days or even months on end!!! Taken at Kurnell National Park, using a Nikonos III, 35mm lens and 1:2 extension tube, single strobe. Photocomp January'05 - Open
Added: January 21st 2005 at 3:51am
Pretty in pink Pretty in pink
These tiny tropical shrimps (Periclemenes soror) are found along the NSW coast in summer on the underside of seastars, always changing their colors to suit the coloring of their hosts. Pinkish/purple stars have shrimps as per picture, red seastars have red shrimps etc. Equipment: Nikonos III, 35mm lens with 2:1 (double life-size magnification - not 1:2) extension tube, single flash. Photocomp January '05 - Open
Added: January 21st 2005 at 3:48am
The boy and the shark The boy and the shark
My friend's first encounter with grey nurse sharks. His eyes almost popped out of his head. Taken at Maroubra, NSW using a Nikonos III, 15mm lens, twin strobes. Photocomp January '05 - Open
Added: January 20th 2005 at 3:02am
Safety in numbers Safety in numbers
Striped catfish hang out in big, compact schools to avoid predation. Taken at Camp Cove, Sydney Harbour, using a Nikonos III, 35mm lens 1;3 extension tube, single strobe. Photocomp January '05 - Open
Added: January 20th 2005 at 2:55am
Curiousity killed the wrasse... Curiousity killed the wrasse...
This comb wrasse (Coris picta) was adamant on seeing his own reflection in my macro lens. Shot with a Nikonos III, 35mm lens and 9" macro converter, twin Aquasea strobes. About December 1997. Photocomp January '05 - Open
Added: January 15th 2005 at 5:43am
The Sydney Pygmy Pipehorse The Sydney Pygmy Pipehorse
I thought my eyes were deceiving me. All I could make out was a little white fish resembling a seahorse, no bigger than a 50-cent piece. Yet it was so elaborately disguised I literally bumped into it head first.....
Added: December 14th 2004 at 4:13am
Baby Port Jackson Baby Port Jackson
This little PJ pup was part of a pack of 15-20 little babies in Watsons Bay, Sydney. We observed them for over a month in September 2001, before they moved out into deeper water and finally disappeared. Photocomp December '04 - Open
Added: December 14th 2004 at 12:45am
New kid on the block New kid on the block
This is a new discovery from Sydney waters. The little fish, a Sydney Pygmy Pipehorse (Idiotropiscis lumnitzeri), is very hard to photograph. This is a 1:1 shot with a Nikonos III.
Added: December 13th 2004 at 3:04am
You're being watched! You're being watched!
Taken on the left-hand-side of Camp Cove, NSW over very silty, barren ground with a 1:1 framer on a Nikonos III. Photocomp December '04 - Open
Added: December 13th 2004 at 2:46am
You're being watched! You're being watched!
Taken on the left-hand-side of Camp Cove, NSW over very silty, barren ground with a 1:1 framer on a Nikonos III. Photocomp December '04 - Open
Added: December 13th 2004 at 2:46am
Gotcha! Gotcha!
We were nightdiving under the Kurnell refinery jetty, NSW and these little spotted Dumpling Squids were all over the place! I have never seen so many in a night, and many were feeding on the hinge-beak shrimps. Photocomp December '04 - Open
Added: December 13th 2004 at 2:38am
Hello, pleased to meet you! Hello, pleased to meet you!
The first dive I had with my wife was at Shark Point, Clovelly, NSW, where she met my long time buddy Bart the blue wrasse late one afternoon. Photocomp December '04 - Open
Added: December 8th 2004 at 6:11am
Seaslugs - Part I. Headshield slugs and Sea hares. Seaslugs - Part I. Headshield slugs and Sea hares.
I have compiled a sequential account of the five main seaslug orders, supported by photographic records and some likely Sydney dive sites to encounter members of each order.
Added: November 24th 2004 at 4:21am
Seaslugs - Part II. Sidegill slugs and Sap-sucking slugs Seaslugs - Part II. Sidegill slugs and Sap-sucking slugs
In this article I will introduce you to the next two in hierarchical sequence. Seaslugs are indeed fascinating creatures and are a favorite for many photographers. They do not move about very quickly at all, which is a characteristic that makes them easy subjects to shoot. Often it is not the case of 'the one that got away', but the case of 'Oh no! I have run out of film again!'.
Added: November 23rd 2004 at 6:17am
Seaslugs - Part III. Nudibranchs Seaslugs - Part III. Nudibranchs
I wish I had a pound for every time I heard a diver say: 'Did you see the beautiful nudibranch down there?' - not knowing, that the creature was only another opistobranch and not a true nudie?
Added: November 23rd 2004 at 3:50am
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