South Sydney

View of the skyline - Photo courtesy of ATDW

The Southern half of the Sydney area is rich in bushland and unspoiled coast and begins on the southern shores of Botany Bay extending to Kurnell and the Botany Bay National Park in the east, and the beach side suburb of Cronulla and expansive Royal National Park in the south.

The Kurnell Peninsula in the Botany Bay National Park marks the place of first contact between Aboriginal Australians and Lieutenant James Cook, who landed here in 1770. The Discovery Centre at Kurnell explains the history, development and Aboriginal significance of the area.

There are plenty of cafes and restaurants in the beachside suburb of Cronulla, accessible by train, and from there the lovely township of Bundeena is a short ferry ride across the Port Hacking River. The ferry provides access into the Royal National Park where short walks or extended hikes are available to explore the rugged coastline and lush Australian bush.

Some Southern Suburbs highlights are:
- Catch a ferry from Cronulla to Bundeena and go on one of many walking trails through The Royal National Park to discover secluded beaches and restful picnic areas.
- Walk on the spot where Lieutenant James Cook landed on the Monument Track, Kurnell.
- Try your luck deep-sea fishing or go whale watching from June to October.
- Join a tour or hire your own BBQ boat and cruise the Port Hacking River.

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Photos

Looking out to sea - Photo courtesy of ATDW
Snorkelling in Gordon's Bay - Photo courtesy of Tourism NSW
Ocean pools at Coogee Beach - Photo courtesy of Tourism NSW

Underwater Recommendations

Despite being a city with millions of inhabitants Sydney?Ĭs waters are surprisingly rich in marine life. From waking up to arriving at a great dive site should not take you longer than an hour since most beaches, coves and bays in the heart of the city offer easy access to great dive and snorkel sites. Discover the rocky reefs and kelp beds teeming with life, such as Port Jackson sharks, Eastern Blue Gropers, Giant Cuttlefish, Weedy Seadragons and moray eels.
Boat dives provide access to deeper or more challenging dive spots where you can explore beautiful sponge gardens and many different wrecks.

Getting There

Sydney has an international and a domestice airport in the south. Some very competitive rates for domestic flights are available. Regional Express, Jetstar, Qantas and Virgin Blue all offer cheap flights. Just note that if you are transferring form an international to a domestic flight and you are not flying with Qantas it can be a bit more tricky to get from one airport to the other. Just give yourself plenty of time in between flights.
Public transport can be used to from the airport and to get around in the CBD fairly easily.
Of course there are plenty of places available for car and van rental or buying a second hand car.
Busses and trains to and from many destinations depart and arrive at Central Station.
Taxis are another option and can be quite economical for transport of more than one person over short distances.

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